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High performance with high power consumption

High performance with high power consumption

of Maximilian Hohm
Raptor Lake is scheduled to replace Alder Lake as Intel’s top processors this fall and offer a decent boost in performance. The Chinese tester “ExtremePlayer” has now proven this and has carried out the first benchmarks for the new processors, where they were placed well ahead of their predecessors in some cases. Read more about this below.

Intel’s Raptor Lake is said to succeed Alder Lake on Socket 1700 and, in addition to faster DDR5 memory, will deliver higher performance through detailed optimizations, higher boost rates, and more E-Cores. So far, it seems that the SKUs, which are also available in Alder Lake, will receive direct successors and the spearhead will once again be represented by the Core i9-13900K. Among them are the Core i7-13700K and Core i5-13600K, which were tested by the Chinese hardware tester “ExtremePlayer” on Bilibili in early benchmarks.

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Core i7-13700K vs. 12700K benchmarks

Font: ExtremePlayer via Bilibili




A big innovation compared to Alder Lake is Gracemont’s E-Cores, eight of which are also installed on the two smaller chips. The boost clock increases by 400 MHz up to 5.4 GHz on the Core i7 and by 300 MHz up to a maximum of 5.2 GHz on the Core i5. There’s also a mirrored L2 cache and support for DDR5-5,600. ExtremePlayer tested the processors on two Asrock Z690 Steel Legends with DDR5-6400 and DDR4-3200.


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On the CPU-Z integrated benchmark, the i7-13700K boosts single-core performance by 10 percent compared to its predecessor, while it’s a respectable 32-34 percent on multicore. The i5-13600K is only slightly faster on a single core at five percent than the i5-12600K, but on multicore it increases by between 39 and 41 percent. These huge multi-core performance gains over much lower single-core performance gains are a result of higher power consumption. In the AIDA64 FPU test, the 13700K drew 244 watts, almost 60 watts more than a 12700K, while the 13600K drew 178 watts, still 30 watts more than a 12600K.

Font: bilibili & Videocardz