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Wonder Woman is actually about to attack and dethrone God in new comic

Wonder Woman is actually about to attack and dethrone God in new comic

Superhero comics love to play with demons and devils, but they get a bit cagey when bringing in the other half of that equation: God. You know, the concept of a single monotheistic creator god, specifically the one at the heart of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam?

In this week’s Wonder Woman #757, the Phantom Stranger — the mysterious guy sentenced to eternal life for pissing off God — showed up to drag one of Wonder Woman’s friends to Heaven to face judgement and redemption. Diana disagreed that her friend’s time had come, asserting that she deserved more time on earth to redeem herself in life.

The issue ends with Wonder Woman standing at the gates of Heaven itself, swearing to fight God for her beliefs. And this is only the beginning of Wonder Woman being absolutely metal in this week’s comics.

What else is happening in the pages of our favorite comics? We’ll tell you. Welcome to Polygon’s weekly list of the books that our comics editor enjoyed this past week. It’s part society pages of superhero lives, part reading recommendations, part “look at this cool art.” There may be some spoilers. There may not be enough context. If you missed the last one, read this.


Wonder Woman #757

Image: Steve Orlando, Jesus Merino/DC Comics

Writer Steve Orlando is a big Wonder Woman fan, and he is not going quietly in what’s likely to be his last Wonder Woman story for a good long while. Paula Von Gunther is the villain of his final arc, and it’s hard to get more Classic Wonder Woman than Diana standing up before God to argue on behalf of her own enemy’s potential for redemption.

Wynd #1

Wynd dreams that he has transformed into a scary winged monster, threatening his friend Oakley, in Wynd #1, Boom Studios (2020).

Image: James Tynion IV, Michael Dialynas/Boom Studios

I’ve never enjoyed James Tynion’s work more than when he’s writing horror-tinged sci-fi-fantasy about queer teens, and so I’m excited to watch him reunite with Michael Dialynas, his collaborator from horror-tinged queer teens sci-fi epic The Woods. So far, the YA-aimed Wynd is a about a queer kid dealing with secretly being a magical minority and having a huge crush on the Royal Gardener’s kind and beefy son.

Wonder Woman drives her invisible chainsaw into the chest of the Batman Who Laughs, shredding him in two, in Dark Nights: Death Metal #1, DC Comics (2020).

Image: Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo/DC Comics

If you’ve started to really get tired of the Batman Who Laughs being in a million comics, creators Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo may have heard you — because it looks like Wonder Woman has sawed him in freakin half with her invisible Chainsaw of Truth in the first issue of Dark Nights: Death Metal.

A Man Among Ye #1

Hair blowing in the ocean breeze, pirate extraordinaire Anne Bonny lowers a smoking pistol, saying “I do so love the smell of gunpowder in the morning,” in A Man Among Ye #1, Image Comics (2020).

Image: Stephanie Phillips, Craig Cermak/Image Comics

A Man Among Ye is a new ongoing series seeking to take the scanty reliable facts surrounding the lives of pirates Anne Bonny, Mary Read, and John Rackham and turn them into some fun adventure fiction. After one issue, I’m ready to read more.

Wonder Woman: Death Earth #3

Wonder Woman approaches Superman’s mummified corpse in the Fortress of Solitude, and recovers her buried memories of killing him, in Wonder Woman: Dead Earth #3, DC Comics (2020).

Image: Daniel Warren Johnson/DC Comics

I’ve been back and forth on whether I like Wonder Woman: Dead Earth — a post-apocalyptic tale where Wonder Woman is the only “superhero” left on a blasted world populated by a meager and dwindling remnant of humanity — but the book’s third issue really did it for me. Perhaps it’s a story that will appeal to me more once I can see where it’s going. Any way you cut it, though, Daniel Warren Johnson is still drawing the heck out of this book.

Ant-Man #5

The massive insect, Ve’trock tells Ant-Man that he can see his worthiness from how he reacted to the death of Pamela the Ant, in Ant-Man #5, Marvel Comics (2020).

Image: Zeb Wells, Dylan Burnett/DC Comics

Farewell to a lovely little series with the final issue of Ant-Man, and farewell to Pamela the Ant, the greatest character find (and loss) of 2020.

Strange Adventures #2

Naked, Mister Terrific gets out of bed in the dark of night, and walks to another room. Over comms, he tells Batman that there are holes in Adam Strange’s story, and he’s accepting Batman’s request to investigate him, in Strange Adventures #2, DC Comics (2020).

Image: Tom King, Mitch Gerads/DC Comics

I was hesitant about Strange Adventures #1, but #2, finally out after a long coronavirus hiatus, has gotten me re-interested all over again. This week’s issue was a character study in what motivates Mister Terrific, “the third smartest man on earth.” Also it had a lot of great Mitch Gerads beefcake illustrations.

The Savage Beard of She Dwarf

She Dwarf gushes over the display of soaps and bathbombs at a bath house, exclaiming to her friend Hack Battler, “Hack! They have a bath bombsmith here!” in The Savage Beard of She Dwarf, Oni Press (2020).

Image: Kyle Latino/Oni Press

Want a really cute one-shot fantasy comic that starts out funny and transforms into a sweet story about found family and struggling to claim your own mixed cultural heritage? And one that has great art, gorgeous colors, and amazing monster design? Please read She-Dwarf. I read it when it was an unfinished webcomic and I was so happy to get the ending this week.

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