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Waku: Cooling a gaming PC with a gas pump: Bad idea?

Waku: Cooling a gaming PC with a gas pump: Bad idea?

from Maximilian Hohm
Youtuber Linus Sebastian has established one of the world’s largest tech outlets testing current hardware. Most of the videos have serious, meaningful content that helps with buying decisions or shows what’s technically feasible, but a recent clip uses a completely large gas-powered pump to cool a computer with water. Read more about this below.

In water-cooled PCs, pumps of the Laing D5 or DDC type are usually installed, which can be supplied internally through the PC. If extreme pressures and powerful pumps are needed, there are models like the Eheim 1262, which already requires 230 volts with its own mains plug and is actually designed for use in an aquarium. But even those pumps were either too weak or too normal for Linus Sebastian of Linus Tech Tips for his latest water cooling project.

[PLUS]: 10 water cooling pumps in the test








Exemplary fuel pump

Source: Guide




In a current video on his channel, he and his colleague Alex Clark are installing a gasoline pump with a maximum output of 2.5 HP, which corresponds to approximately 1.84 kW. The aforementioned Eheim 1262 is 80 watts by comparison, while a typical D5 pump is around 12-25 watts. The gasoline driven pump is of course not designed for PC water cooling and many adapters must be used before the hoses can be attached to it.

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At first they test the pump on a faulty PC and recognize the issues of the high performance which leads to various PC leaks. However, to test the actual performance of the cooling solution, a working computer equipped with a Ryzen 9 5950X and a Geforce RTX 3090 is finally used. Thanks to the bypass mode, it is capable of absorbing 800 watts and was tested on the 3D Mark Time Spy Extreme. With a maximum power consumption of 760 watts, the card managed a respectable graphics score of 11,600 points at a maximum temperature of 44 degrees Celsius. Fortunately, although the cooling circuit leaked and the existing D5 pump was probably destroyed by the experiment, the PC appears to have survived without further damage at the end of the video.

Source: Linus Tech Tips